________________________Please do not hesitate to direct all comments, questions, and inquiries to grahamarader@gmail.com_____________________________

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Map of the Day: "An Accurate map of North and South Carolina With Their Indian Frontiers" Henry Mouzon, 1775


The Most Important 18th-Century Map of the Carolinas, Used by Washington in the Revolutionary War


Henry Mouzon
"An accurate Map of North and South Carolina With Their Indian Frontiers"
Published in Thomas Jefferys's "American Atlas"
Copperplate engraving: two sheets, each app. 21” x 55”
London: Sayer & Bennett, 1775

Henry Mouzon's landmark map of the Carolinas was the primary source for the American, English and French armies during the Revolutionary War. George Washington's copy of the map, folded and backed on cloth so it could be safely transported in his saddlebag, is today in the collection of the American Geographical Society. The example owned by Lieutenant General J.B.D. de Vimeur Rochambeau, who with his French troops marched alongside Washington to Yorktown, is in the Library of Congress, and the copy owned by the British general Henry Clinton is in the William L. Clements Library in Ann Arbor. That the foremost figures of the War for Independence relied on this map does not begin to indicate its importance and influence. For over fifty years, Mouzon's map was the source for information about the geography and topography of the Carolinas, and was copied frequently by other mapmakers for its amazing detail and accuracy.

Mouzon based his map on years of personal surveying experience, as well as over a decade spent critically assessing and incorporating previous information. For North Carolina, Mouzon inserted for the first time Tryon County, Pelham County (later called Sampson), and the topography west of the Catawba River is more detailed and accurate than on any previous map. Mouzon also advanced beyond earlier maps in his inclusion of rivers, streams, roads, and physical features like "White Oak or Tryon Mountains" and "Kings Mountain." For South Carolina, Mouzon added rivers and Indian settlements west of the Cherokee Indian boundary lines, and his depiction of the eastern precincts was more sophisticated than anything that had come before. Besides details of natural features, Mouzon's map depicts forts, parishes, bridges, roads, Indian paths, and boundaries, and includes insets of Charleston and Port Royal harbors. This is truly a landmark map. Its excellence above preceding depictions of the vast Carolinas was recognized by all countries involved in the Revolutionary War, and it remained unrivaled well into the 19th century. 

Offered at $48,000

Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668.



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Please do not hesitate to direct all comments, questions, and inquiries to grahamarader@gmail.com




Offering of the Day: "Wild Duck Shooting. A Good Day's Sport." Currier and Ives, 1854

Currier & Ives
Original Painting by A. F. Tait 1853
"Wild Duck Shooting. A Good Day’s Sport."
Hand Colored Lithograph
Framed: 44 ¼ x 36 ½ inches; Paper: 22 x 29 ¾ inches
New York, 1854

The publishing firm of Currier & Ives created the most popular and highly regarded lithographs of quintessentially American scenes ever produced. The quality, vast scope and engagingly populist style of their works have made their names synonomous with an idealistic vision of nineteenth-century American promise and optimism. Currier & Ives was founded in New York in 1835 by Nathaniel T. Currier, who had been apprenticed as a youth to the Boston lithographic firm of William S. & John Pendleton. In 1857, James Merritt Ives, the company’s bookkeeper and Currier’s brother-in-law, was made a partner. Their subject matter ranged from rural life, ships, trains, animal and sporting scenes to religious images and spectacular news events.

Many hunting scenes that Currier & Ives printed were the designs of Arthur Tait and Frances Palmer. In "Wild Duck Shooting. A Good Day's Sport.," a hunter, watched by his dog, stands in a boat loading his gun. His companion sits beside him on the edge of the boat, taking a duck from the mouth of the second dog. This example has weathered the test of time, boasting fantastic color and paper quality, and would make a wonderful addition to the collection of any gamesman or collector with an apprecation of the outdoors.
 
Offered at $16,000
Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668.


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Please do not hesitate to direct all comments, questions, and inquiries to grahamarader@gmail.com



Offering of the Day: "Life on the Prarie. The Buffalo Hunt" Currier and Ives, 1862

Currier & Ives
Original Painting by A. F. Tait
Life on the Prairie. The “Buffalo Hunt”.
Hand Colored Lithograph
Framed: 44 x 38 inches ; Paper: 29 ½ x 23 ½ inches
New York, 1862
 
The highly regarded lithographs by the publishing firm of Currier & Ives owe their popularity to the fact that they documented the American experience both its common values and achievements. Nathaniel Currier began his lithographic career as an apprentice in 1828. By the mid-1830's he had established his own firm on Spruce Street in New York City. In 1857 James Ives became a partner in the flourishing business. Their names became synonymous with an idealistic vision of 19th-century American promise and optimism. And, the firm enjoyed broad productivity as they were able to draw imagery from original works by many of the finest American genre painters of the times, including (among many others) Fanny Palmer, Louis Maurer, Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait and George Durrie.

Life on the Prairie - Buffalo Hunt, was lithographed after a painting by A.F. Tait, 1861. While Tait had not journeyed West, his work is dramatic and realistic and because of its detail is considered graphically reliable. Advertising for this print best describes it in saying:

"Another exciting episode of prairie life. In the foreground, an old buffalo bull, driven to desperation, is charging at full gallop on the hunter, who, without slackening the speed of his horse, maneuvers to avoid the horns of the infuriated animal; another mounted hunter in the background, is discharging his rifle at the buffalo. Others of the herd are seen lying wounded on the ground, or galloping off in the distance."

In 1932 a group of twelve prominent collectors gathered in New York City to judge what they considered would represent the best large folios produced by Currier. One of the participants in this project was Charles Messer Stow, antiques editor of the New York Sun. Charles, sensing a story, decided to cover this selection of Best 50 Large Folio Currier & Ives prints. The New York Sun published the selection process and one selected large folio print per day for 50 consecutive days. This attention sparked a renewed interest in Currier & Ives prints. Life on the Prairie -The Buffalo Hunt was number six (6) on the Best 50 list. Auction records of the 1920's and 1930's demonstrate that even in the worst years of the great depression large sums of money were being spent on these prints and they still enjoy wide interest today. This is a vibrant and notable work by a uniquely American publishing firm, and perhaps the most spectacular image of the thousands that Currier & Ives produced.

Offered at $35,000
Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668.
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Please do not hesitate to direct all comments, questions, and inquiries to grahamarader@gmail.com

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Audubon Offering of the Day: "Columbia Jay" John James Audubon (1785-1851)

John James Audubon (1785-1851)
Plate Number 96: Columbia Jay or [Magpie Jay] from Birds of America
Aquatint with original hand-color
Framed size framed size 49 1/2” x 37”
London: 1827-38

Born in Haiti, John James Audubon spent his youth in France, where he studied under Jacques-Louis David. Returning to America in 1803, he embarked upon a series of ill-fated ventures as a farmer, merchant, and portrait painter. However, none of these occupations engaged Audubon as much as his avocation: the search for birds and the studies and drawings that he made to record his observations. A tireless entrepreneur, Audubon devoted himself to an unprecedented project, becoming the first to attempt the seemingly insurmountable task of documenting all the bird life of North America. This task grew out of a genuine and passionate interest in his subjects, and Audubon determined not only to complete a project that no one else had undertaken, but to approach it in an entirely innovative manner. His style and his persona were much like the European notion of America itself: ambitious, animated, larger than life. The artist's tireless efforts and remarkable talent culminated in the publication of his 435-plate Birds of America (1827-1838, London), undoubtedly the greatest work on birds ever produced. The celebration of this quintessentially American work, and the enterprising, talented artist who created it, has grown steadily since the time of its publication.


The spectacular Magpie Jay is one of several neotropical birds Audubon classified as North American on the basis of specimens purportedly coming from the Columbia River. In fact, this bird must have come by ship from the west coast of Mexico. The only definite sighting of this species in the United States was of a solitary bird that came daily to a feeding shelf in an Arizona border-town. Although it could have strayed from its Mexican homeland, most thought this was a special bird that had escaped from captivity.

Offered at $55,000

Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668.


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Please do not hesitate to direct all comments, questions, and inquiries to grahamarader@gmail.com


Monday, August 29, 2011

Globe of the Day: "Smith’s Terrestrial Globe and Smith’s Celestial Globe Pair" Charles Smith & Son



























Charles Smith and Son
"Smith’s Terrestrial Globe and
Smith’s Celestial Globe
"

Both published in London 
ca. 1825
Height (in stand) appr. 43 in.; diameter appr. 24 in.
Smith's terrestrial globe contains the courses of the “most celebrated circumnavigators” and the celestial globe contains all the principal stars as calculated and detailed in the works of Wollaston, Flamsted, De La Caille, Havelius, Mayer, Bradley, Herschel, Maskelyne, and the Transition of the Astronomical Society of London. 
 
The globes are constructed of hollow papier-mache hemispheres which join along the equator and are covered with several thin layers of gesso plaster.  Onto which are laid the hand-colored copperplate engraving gores on laid paper.  Each sphere is placed in a fine mahogany tripod stand, at the top of which is the horizon ring encircling the circumference of each globe; horizon rings both with laid down printed paper displaying the months of the year and the signs of the Zodiac.  The meridian rings are brass, engraved with longitude markings.  The mahogany stands terminate in brass shoes and casters surrounding a central compass. 

Offered at $190,000. for the pair

Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668. 


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Please do not hesitate to direct all comments, questions, and inquiries to grahamarader@gmail.com

Friday, August 19, 2011

Rare Map Offering of the Day: " Orbis Typus Universalis Ivxta Hydrographorum Traditionem." Martin Waldseemuller (1570-1614)

 
Martin Waldseemuller (1470 - 1521)
Orbis Typus Universalis Ivxta Hydrographorum Traditionem
29 1.2 x 35 inches
Woodcut
References: Rodney W. Shirley, The Mapping of the World (London, 1983), n. 35.

In 1507 Martin Waldseemuller published the first map to name the New World "America," in acknowledgment of explorer Amerigo Vespucci's discoveries. There is only one copy of the 1507 map in existence and it is in the holdings of the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. By 1513, and with the publication of this map in his Ptolemaic atlas (see n.6 above), he had recognized the real importance of Christopher Columbus. In an attempt to rectify his earlier mistake, Waldseemuller removed not only the name but also the whole North American continent from his 1513 map. In a sense it was too late, as "America" had now become the popular name for the New World. But, in this "modern" world map Waldseemuller attempted to assert Columbus' important discoveries in the western hemisphere and give the explorer the credit he deserved. Therefore, this map is sometimes called the "Admiral's Map" in view of comments made by Waldseemuller in the text (which accompanied his atlas) suggesting that information for the mapping of the New World had been supplied by Christopher Columbus.Offered at $90,000.



Substantiating this retraction is another map in the same volume. On the regional map of the Caribbean and Atlantic Ocean ("Tabula Terre Nove"), South America is labeled "Terra Incognita" (unknown land) and bears an inscription indicating that these lands were discovered by Columbus, with no indication of Amerigo Vespucci's role in the exploration of the northern coast of South America. Waldseemuller extended the map southwards and westwards in order to show discoveries in Africa and the rest of the southern hemisphere by Columbus and Pedro Alvares Cabral. The map focuses on the Caribbean islands of Hispaniola and Isabella (Cuba) and much of the northern coast of South America and of Brazil. A vague indication of Labrador is also given. This map is also available here through Arader Galleries New York City.
 

Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668. 


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Please do not hesitate to direct all comments, questions, and inquiries to grahamarader@gmail.com

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Rare Map/City Plan of the Day: "Plan of the City and Suburbs of New Orleans" Jacques Tanesse, 1825

"ONE OF THE FINEST EXAMPLES OF 19th CENTURY URBAN CARTOGRAPHY"
-John Reps
Jacques Tanesse’s Plan of New Orleans
Drawn by Jacques Tanesse
Engraving, Engraved by William Rollinson
Plan of the City and Suburbs of New Orleans
Paper size: 20 3/8” x 32 1/4”
Frame size: 31 1/2” x 43 3/4”
Published New York: Charles Del Vecchio & New Orleans: Pierre Maspero, 1825
References: M. Fielding, American Engravers upon Copper and Steel... (Philadelphia, 1917) 1294; I.N. Phelps Stokes & D.C. Haskell, American Historical Prints Early Views of American Cities, Etc. (New York, 1932) F-6; J.W. Reps, Cities of the American West (Princeton, 1979) 21, fig. 1.17; G.G. Deak, Picturing America, 1497-1899 (Princeton, 1988) 292; J.J. Poesch (ed.), Printmaking in New Orleans (Jackson, 2006) 78-79, fig. 9


This detailed engraving far surpasses any other printed view or map of New Orleans. Made by the surveyor Jacques Tanesse,  the plan is an aerial projection from a height distant enough to give a good idea of the city’s crescent shape.  John Reps, Cornell University professor emeritus and cartographic scholar, calls Taness’s work “one of the finest examples of 19th-century American urban cartography.”  By August 1817, the map was available in New Orleans when Tanesse presented two copies to the city, one for the mayor’s office, the other for the council chamber.

 The city’s various states of progress in the its expansion are superbly charted in the plan’s neat grid layout, which is accentuated by large open places given over to public plazas and buildings.  Tanesse also includes the breastworks that proved to be very decisive in America’s defeat of the British during the famous Battle of New Orleans in January of 1815.  This interesting detail is shown perpendicular to the Mississippi River at the lower right-hand corner of the city plan.  Twelve symmetrically placed border insets show the city’s most important buildings, and all are drawn in elevation, with an occasional attempt at perspective.  Although simply executed, they represent the French, Spanish, and American periods of New Orleans history.  In the title cartouche, an exotic American Indian family of unknown tribe poses near a lion skin.  Here is where the second printed view of the city is depicted - the cathedral flanked by the Cabildo and the Presbytère.  Today, as a note, it stands with a second story that has been added by the U.S. government to facilitate its use as a courthouse.

 Jacques Tanesse’s plan was issued in two states: the first in 1817 and this the second edition in 1825.  This example, from the 1825 issue, celebrates the visit of General Lafayette to New Orleans, where he makes noteable changes that took place to the city in the intervening eight years. Tanesse engraves the sixty-foot triumphal arch which was built in wood and canvas and erected at the Place d’Armes for the occasion of the General’s arrival.  This he sets at the bottom of the map on land across the river, which misleadingly suggests that it stood there.  The arch was designed by city architect Joseph Pilié and painted to resemble marble by Jean Baptiste Fogliardi, the scene painter for the Théâtre d'Orléans.  Another significant alteration is Tanesse’s addition of a tower to the cathedral. The original rectangular format was adapted with the clever device of a lunette breaking the top of the border to accommodate the height of the new spire.
  
Offered at $35,000.

Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668. 


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Please do not hesitate to direct all comments, questions, and inquiries to grahamarader@gmail.com

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

A GREAT AMERICAN takes on the Mutual Fund Industry and the Lobbyists that work for them.

Here is my letter back to David Swenson who just wrote an incredibly accurate, fierce exposure of the "churners" in the Mutual Fund Industry who use lobbyists to manipulate Congress.

It follows:

Just read your article in the NYT's. Nice set of two ton balls you have David.  Hope you dont get firebombed this weekend.  A lot of fat, rich guys with a lot of power pay congress a lot of money to keep their game going.   You took their pants off at low tide!!!

Having been out of the USA for two weeks, the clear advantages of living in the USA are overwhelming.  Things cost 40 percent more in Europe.  We truly are a blessed country but the rewards go to those who know how to play the lobbying game.  We get away with this by having specacular, overwhelming natural resources and the greatest univ system in the world that you personally have made huge contributions to.  Europe does not come close to us in this regard.  We crush them.  Their 500 best schools stink compared to ours.  So GOD BLESS YOU DAVID SWENSEN.  Your life has truly made a big difference for the rest of us.

But you NEVER are going to change lobbying no matter how many superb stories you write.

Just think about it - look at the shit that Bill Gates had to take for 7 years because he refused to pay lobbyists at the start of his career.  They sure taught him a lesson for ignoring them.  Steve Jobs PERSONALLY told me that he, Larry Ellison and Scott McNealy made THE condition of their support of Al Gore and Clinton was their wish to "break" Gate's control of his software monopoly.   Gore came through and personally did all he could to humiliate Gates using the Dept of Justice.  Gates had a diet of gravel casserole for the eight years that Gore was VP.

And the Defense Industry - wow.  Do we really NEED to spend 500b a year for shit that kills people.  But those guys run brilliant lobbying campaigns with Congress led almost invisibly by Lester Crown.  What a genius he is.

So you are RIGHT and superbly accurate.  I LOVED your points but it aint going to change.

Next time I would like to see more facts and figures to back up what you have said.  Since I know you, I trust you completely but for someone else seeing the REAL numbers crunched would make your truly impt points more compelling.  You should trust your audience to be smart enough to crunch the numbers along with you.

Amazing how natural resources make people look good no matter how poor they are as managers.  Perry is a shoe in but all he has done is take advantage of the price of oil generating good times for TX.   I love the USA.  What a great country.  Keep being my hero and making it better.




Rare Map Offering of the Day: " Isola d. Sardegna." Joan Oliva (1570-1614)

Joan Oliva (fl. 1570-1614)
Isola d. Sardegna
Illuminated manuscript portolan chart on vellum heightened in gold
20 5/8" x 27 7/8" (522mm x 707mm)
[Marseilles: ca. 1600]
$135,000


Portolan charts are the predecessors of the modern navigational chart and appeared in the Mediterranean world during the thirteenth century. Their exact place of origin is disputed but the most important early centers were Catalonia, the Balearic Islands and Italy.  The need for reliable navigational aids, particularly of the waters around Italy, became more pressing as trade increased between Venice and other Mediterranean ports.

Joan [Johannes or Juan] Oliva was a member of a large family of Catalan hydrographers, who for over a century dominated portolan making in the western Mediterranean.  Charts signed by no less than sixteen different members of the Oliva family are recorded between 1538 and 1673, from Majorca, Messina, Naples, Leghorn, Florence, Venice, Malta, Palermo and Marseilles.

Joan appears to have been the most prolific and highly regarded of this famous family.  The earliest of his charts originate from Messina but he is also recorded as living in Naples and Marseilles where he is thought to have died.  His known works are apparently scarse and in A. E. Nordenskiold’s Periplus (Stockholm: 1897) he was only able to find 3 atlases recorded in a private collection in Majorca and a further atlas in the British Library (Egerton MS).  He believed that ten more individual charts are existed.  This particular example was most probably bound in a very large portolan atlas and is in exceptional condition.

The chart shows the Spanish possession of Sardinia.  The island became a territory of Jaume II of Aragon in 1323 and reverted to the Spanish Crown after the unification of Spain under Ferdinand and Isabella in 1479.  The coastline is drawn in blue with some smaller islands shown in red.  Rivers are marked as blue and highlighted in white.  Towns are represented by idealized buildings and labeled in brown ink.  Principal towns are written in red calligraphy and also bear flags decorated with gold leaf.  The interior of the island is also adorned with symbolized mountain features.  The whole chart is decorated with rhumb-lines  and set within in a gilded border.  The rhumb-lines meet at a central rhumb-point, the elaborate compass rose, which orients the portolan to the east with north to the left.  At the left margin is drawn an elaborately embellished scale bar.  The title, Isola d. Sardegna, is set in a banner at the upper edge of the chart and beside it is the coat of arms of Spain (previously of Aragon before the unification of Spain), decorated in red and gold leaf.


Offered at $135,000.

Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668. 


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Please do not hesitate to direct all comments, questions, and inquiries to grahamarader@gmail.com

Monday, August 15, 2011

Audubon Offering of the Day: "American White Pelican" John James Audubon (1785-1851)

John James Audubon
Plate 311: “American White Pelican” from “Birds of America”
Aquatint engraving with original hand color, 39 ¾" x 27"
London, 1827-38

With justified elation, Audubon wrote, “I feel great pleasure, good Reader, in assuring you, that our White Pelican, which has hitherto been considered the same as that found in Europe is quite different. In consequence of this discovery I have honored it with the name of my beloved country, over the mighty streams of which, may this splendid bird wander free...” Audubon saw this magnificent bird as a symbol of America, and he immortalized it in this image, perhaps his most majestic and iconic masterpiece. Audubon demonstrates a remarkably sophisticated treatment of composition and plumage texture in this aquatint, minimizing landscape in order to silhouette the imposing pelican against a dramatic night sky. The American White Pelican is one of only three nocturnal scenes depicted in the "Birds of America,” and the bird’s bright white plumage stands out brilliantly from the deep-blue setting, its form emerging with heightened clarity.

The most famous of John James Audubon's splendid Birds of America have several common characteristics, even while the images themselves are startling in their individuality. Audubon was at his most successful artistically when he best combined graceful, dramatic compositions with meticulous naturalism. In other words, Audubon's most striking birds are those where he used his greatest talents as an ornithologist and as an artist -- two métiers which are generally considered highly difficult to reconcile. While all of Audubon's Birds of America hint at his equal expertise in the worlds of science and art, several images stand out as his masterpieces. They are, by extension, the crowning achievements of ornithological art (and, as many would argue, high points of American 19th century art in general). Audubon’s “American White Pelican” ranks among the artist’s most splendid full-page compositions, and is arguably the most engaging image of the 435-plate Birds of America.

The White Pelican inspired some of Audubon’s most intense and compassionate opinions on conservation, notions which placed him far ahead of his time. Having observed that the bird occupied habitats and climates ranging widely from the northwestern “fur countries” as far south as the Gulf of Mexico, he surmised that it was “on account of the constantly increasing numbers of our hostile species that these creatures are urged to proceed towards wild and uninhabited parts of the world where they find that security... necessary to enable them to rear their innocent progeny.” As one of the artist’s most poignant and desirable images, the “American White Pelican” becomes available very rarely, and this particular example is in excellent condition with full margins and bright original color.

Offered at $185,000.

A calm and reasoned response to a London journalist about the state of map collecting.


Here is his letter to me:

Hi Graham,

My name is Simon Garfield, an author and journalist for the Observer in London. I'm currently writing a book about maps for publication by Profile in the UK and Penguin US in October 2012, and I'd very much like to talk to you.

The book will be aimed at a general reader, and will provide a narrative-led anecdotal history of maps - their development, use and philosophy - from medieval times to the present. It will be a journalistic rather than an academic study, and will include much fresh and lively material (an interview, for example, with the men who tried to sell the Hereford Mappa Mundi, a month in the company of the man trying to recreate Roosevelt's giant globe).

When it comes to map dealership, all roads lead to Arader. I know you've featured in books before, but I wonder if I could persuade you to sit down for another chat about your life and world. I've talked to a couple of knowledgeable dealers in the UK, terribly nice, but slightly dull. So I need you in there, not just for your experience and influence, but also your willingness to share them openly.
I'm coming to New York in mid-September for the launch of my most recent book (Just My Type, about the history of fonts), published by Gotham/Penguin. I'll be available anytime between Thursday 15th to Tuesday 20th inclusive, so I wonder, if you're agreeable, whether any of these dates suit. 

With good wishes,
Simon  
Simon Garfield
www.simongarfield.com

07770 482 497
 
Here is my answer to him:
 
Dear Simon, 
 
Would love to meet with you anytime that works for you.

Read my blog.  The reason no one wants to speak with you is because what they are doing is dishonest, sacrilegious and wicked.  Sothebys has just done a much, much, much, much better job and drives all the dealers to ack like common criminals tarting things up, buying from fences and even doing a little stealing themselves.  Cathy Slowther runs the dept at Sothebys and has risen to the top with her steady, cheerful, professional business practices.

Christies in neither good nor bad.  They just dont care.  So Sothebys runs the world market right now.  But Bonhams is coming up fast and is worth interviewing.  David Park and his team are highly capable.

I have been only able to find TWO honest map dealers other than myself in 40 years.  They are Daniel Crouch in London and Oxford and then there is Pierre Joppen in Paris, the king of the good deal and super honest.  They are being copied for you to contact if you wish.  Bruce Marshall comes up with great atlases and is very honest but does not focus on single sheet maps.

Read my blog to get a 1% sense of the crap that I have been putting up with for 40 years.

Just think about it - with what you have learned so far and with the interest that you have already developed, tell me what you think about someone like Potter on Bond Street coloring up maps for ignorant Americans looking for something to do because they have been outbid by obese Saudi's for all the good hookers. And then there is Sanderous in Ghent who tries to color up maps so that they look like original color.  He is getting really good at it and is the world's master faker in this field polluting book fairs and chumming auctions with his Frankensteins.

Sadly competing with these monsters has driven me around the bend.

All during this time miraculously I have been able to give away well over $50,000,000 of inventory to Universities and Colleges in the USA and Switzerland.  Now the material is being used by professors to teach students who are our hope for the future.  It is the only thing that is keeping me out of a straight-jacket.

If you take the time to read my blog, you will get a flavor of what I have been up to in the midst of a snake pit that would even drive Indiana Jones to blanch. 

When you come to NYC, you will see the ONLY stock of significant maps and atlases for sale in the world.   It is about $500,000,000 of all the best possible material. 

See you when it works for you.

Best,

Graham

Graham Arader
29 East 72nd Street
NYC, NY
10021

Friday, August 12, 2011

Fine Art Offering of the Day: "View of New York City as It Appeared on the Eve of the Fire, 1835." Nicolino Calyo (1799-1884)


Nicolino Calyo (1799-1884)

View of New York City as It Appeared on the Eve of the Fire, 1835
Gouache on paper
Paper size: 28” x 20”
Signed, dated, and inscribed at (l.c.): ‘View of the City of New York as it appeared on the evening of the fire 16th Dec 1835 from the mill at Brooklyn’; (at l.r.): ‘From N. Calyo. 402.Broadway.N.York’
References: Patterson, Margaret Sloane: ‘Nicolino Calyo and His Paintings of the Great Fire of New York, December 16th and 17th, 1835,” The American Art Journal, XIV (Spring 1982), pp. 4-22.

            This striking original watercolor of New York is the work of Nicolino Calyo, a talented immigrant artist who captured a unique view of the city during one of the most epochal events of the nineteenth century.  In his View of New York as It Appeared on the Eve of the Fire, 1835, the artist rendered the blaze in Manhattan from the shoreline in Brooklyn. The sky is drenched a dramatic red as the fire licks the night sky. A handful of spectators crowd at the waters edge and beneath the windmill at the right, watching the devastation. Although volunteer fire companies promptly arrived at the scene of the blaze on the night of December 16th, 1835, New York was gripped by the coldest weather recorded in decades. The firemen were virtually powerless as their water supplies and horses froze in the sub-zero clime. The fire, which began at a dry goods establishment of Comstock and Andrews at 25 Mercer (now Beaver) Street, raged out of control for fifteen hours. In its wake, nearly the whole of the First Ward of Manhattan, the heart of New York’s commercial, financial, and civic district, was consumed.  

            Calyo’s career reflects a restless spirit of enterprise and adventure.  Descended from the line of the Viscontes di Calyo of Calabria, the artist was the son of a Neapolitan army officer.  Calyo received his formal training in art at the Naples Academy, and his career took shape amidst the political turbulence of early-19th century Italy, Spain, and France.  He fled Naples after choosing the loosing side of struggles of 1820-21, and by 1829 was part of an Italian exile community in Malta.  This was the keynote of a peripatetic life that saw the artist travel through Europe, to America, within America, perhaps to Europe again, and back to America.  Calyo’s forte was close observation of people and places, meticulously rendered in the precise topographical tradition of his fellow countrymen, Canaletto and Francesco Guardi.  In search of artistic opportunity, Calyo left Malta and, by 1834, was on the opposite side of the Atlantic Ocean in Baltimore, Maryland.  He rapidly drew attention for his artistically rendered visual images of familiar locales, executed with a degree of polish and skill that was second nature for artists trained in the European academic tradition.  Calyo arrived and settled in New York in 1835, inspired by the sights of the flourishing metropolis.

Offered at $95,000.

Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668. 


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Please do not hesitate to direct all comments, questions, and inquiries to grahamarader@gmail.com

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Map of the Day: "A Map of the Inhabited Part of Virginia containing the whole province of Maryland with part of Pensilvania, New Jersey and North Carolina." Peter Jefferson and Joshua Fry

ONE OF ONLY FOUR EXISTING FIRST EDITION, FIRST STATE EXAMPLES OF THE MOST IMPORTANT 18TH CENTURY MAP OF VIRGINIA
Even More Notable for Being the Personal Copy of Jacques Nicolas Bellin, Chief Mapmaker to the French Government During a Period that Included the French and Indian War and the American Revolution
Peter Jefferson and Joshua Fry
"A Map of the Inhabited Part of Virginia containing the whole province of Maryland with part of Pensilvania, New Jersey and North Carolina"
Engraved map on four sheets with original hand color: paper size 30 1/8” x 48 3/8”
Stamp of the French hydrographic office (Dépôt de la Marine), manuscript inscription on verso: “Pour Mr. Bellin Ingenieur de la Marine”
London: Thomas Jefferys, 1751

The map, compiled by Peter Jefferson and Joshua Fry in the first years of the 1750s, is all but unrivaled in its significance for the history of the mapping of Virginia, and of North America as a whole. It went through several editions and states (alterations to the printing plates), and each version is of extreme rarity, but none more so than this map: a recently unearthed example -- only the fourth known in existence -- of the very first state of the first edition. The three other copies are in the collection of the New York Public Library, in the Alderman Library at the University of Virginia, and in the collection of the of Duke of Northumberland at Alnwick. This exceedingly rare map is the only one to have become available in recent memory, and is further distinguished for being the personal copy of the most celebrated French cartographer, Jacques Nicolas Bellin, head of the government hydrographic office. It was this example of Fry and Jefferson’s seminal map that Bellin consulted during the crucial military campaigns that took place over the course of two wars waged on American soil, the French and Indian War, which pitted the French against the British, and the Revolution, in which the French again found themselves opposite the English, this time in alliance with the Americans. This is the map that Bellin would have used as a point of departure for his own maps of the region, and that he would consulted in order to advise the French commanders during critical military maneuvers that held momentous historical import.

The Fry-Jefferson map of the broad area known as Virginia is the fundamental cartographic document of the region from the 18th century. The first map to focus on Virginia was Captain John Smith's of 1612, but after that early and primitive attempt to delineate the area, no exhaustive study was made for over a century. This basic lack was first confronted by the team of Peter Jefferson -- the father of Thomas Jefferson -- and Joshua Fry. The two men were commissioned by the Virginia legislature after a 1751 mandate, issued by the English Lords of Trade, requiring each colony to produce an adequate survey of the region. Fry's experience as master of mathematics at William and Mary, and Jefferson's as a surveyor, was enough to recommend them as commissioners for the compilation of the Virginia map.

The result of the ambitious collaboration between the two men was the most accurate, comprehensive, and complete project in the history of Virginia mapping. The Fry-Jefferson map was the first to delineate the interior regions of Virginia beyond the Tidewater, and included all the major plantations along Virginia's rivers by family name. It was the first printed map to depict the valleys of the Appalachian and Allegheny mountain ranges of the western interior, and to show the complete Virginia river system. The striking cartouche at the lower right is one of the earliest surviving pictorial representations of the Virginia tobacco trade, and a testament to the fact that Fry and Jefferson ensured the same quality in the map's artwork as in its cartography. Historically, this is the most valuable and influential early map of Virginia. This particular example represents an unprecedented opportunity to own one of America's most important cartographic documents of the colonial era.

Offered at $750,000.
 
Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668.

All my predications are coming true

The standard of living is going down in Europe and the United States.

It is going down because the people of China and India no longer are willing to work for peanuts so that white people can consume as much as they want.   We fill up our shopping carts at Wallmart and Home Depot and promise to pay sometime in the future.

It's over and our middle classes dont like it because they dont understand it.  No one is telling them these very simple facts.

Here is what will start happening now - like tomorrow especially in Britain.

The law will be firmly, completely, aggressively enforced for any one doing anything to illegally improve their standard of living.  This means 

1.   The people rioting in the UK will be firmly put down, arrested and sent to prison.

2.   Offshore banking is over.  There will be laws enacted soon to end this farce. 

3.    Police will be paid more, have greater power and shorter tempers.

4.    Lines for everything especially governments services are going to be longer.  Your standard of living is going to decline because it just is going to take longer to get anything you want to use or consume.  The classic example of this are the lines to get through the airport.  If you dont think your standard of living is decreasing because you have to budget an hour to get through "security" you are deluding yourself.

     In the end the standard of living in the US and Europe is going to decline and increase in Asia.  But the gap between the two peoples still will be great.  It just is not going to be AS great.























Tuesday, August 9, 2011

Fine Art Offering of the Day: "Saker Falcons." Joseph Wolf (1820- 1899)

Joseph Wolf (1820-1899)
Saker Falcons
Oil on canvas
Canvas size: 28 1/4" x 20"
Framed size: 35 1/2” x 27 1/2”
Signed and dated l.r.: J. Wolf 1864
Exhibited: Glenbow-Alberta Institute [now the Glenbow Museum], Calgary Canada, “Birds of Prey”

This luminous oil displays Joseph Wolf's mastery of light and form. His rigorously rendered figures are placed in a context that conveys a bright and open sense of wilderness, while reminding the viewer of Nature's brutality. Saker Falcons is a fine and compelling work by this exceptional artist. "The great thing I always aimed at," Wolf told his biographer A. H. Palmer, "was the expression of Life." Wolf believed that intimate knowledge of the living subject, its habits, and its behavior was the key to authentic and successful zoological illustration. As such, his compositions reconciled the categories of art and science in an extraordinary and distinctive manner, becoming dynamic images of animated characterization as wellas scientific documentation.

Wolf, who grew up in Moerz in Prussia, was the first of a select band of continental European bird and animal artists to be attracted to England during the middle and latter half of the nineteenth century. At the age of sixteen he left home and apprenticed himself to the lithographic firm of Gebruder Becker in Coblenz, where he first met his future patron Hermann Schlegel, then the assistant keeper at the museum in Leyden, a prolific author of ornithological works. After brief spells in Frankfurt and Darmstadt, Wolf went to Holland and settled in Leyden in 1840; he was soon at work on the illustrations for Traite de Fauconnerie by Schlegel and Wulverhorst. Working on this book on falconry, Wolf became an expert at portraying birds of prey, a flawless skill of representation that is in full evidence in Saker Falcons. After developing contact with John Gould, Wolf established himself in London, where he exhibited at the Royal Academy, met Edwin Landseer and other animal artists, and won the patronage of discerning collectors like the Duke of Argyll and Lord Derby. Wolf had a long and productive relationship with Gould, contributing plates to The Birds of Asia and The Birds of Great Britain, and Gould became a frequent visitor to Wolf's studio. The rapidity of the growth of his reputation was due, according to his biographer A.H. Palmer, to his power “of revivifying a dried skin and not merely revivifying, but showing the most characteristic and beautiful attitude and expression of the living bird or animal,” and this combination of animation and beauty characterizes Wolf’s Saker Falcons.

Offered at $185,000

Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668.

Monday, August 8, 2011

Audubon Offering of the Day: "Frigate Pelican (Magnificent Frigatebird)." John James Audubon (1785-1851)

 

John James Audubon (1785-1851)
Plate 271 - Frigate Pelican (Magnificent Frigatebird)
The Birds of America
London: Robert Havell, 1827-1838
Hand-colored aquatint and copperplate engravings
38 1/2” x 26”, 49 1/2” x 37” framed
 
John James Audubon is without rival as the most celebrated American Natural History artist.  Audubon devoted his life to realizing his dream of identifying and depicting the birds of North America, and his work has had profound cultural and historical significance.  In the second decade of the 19th century, he set out to travel throughout the wilderness of the United States, drawing every notable species of native bird.  His remarkable ambition and artistic talent culminated in the publication of the monumental Birds of America in 1827-38, a series of 435 aquatints that have only grown in fame since the time of their first appearance.  This work established Audubon as an early American artist who could attract European attention, and for many, he personified New World culture and its emerging independent existence. 

In 1826, Audubon observed and sketched the frigate bird while traveling aboard the ship the Delos, which was sailing from New Orleans to Liverpool. In Audubon’s striking image of the Frigate Pelican, now known as the Magnificent Frigatebird, the artist’s skill in capturing the animated flight of the bird, as it dives for its prey, is beautifully illustrated. With a wingspan exceeding seven feet, the Frigate Pelican is truly an awesome sight and, according to Audubon, could be found breeding in the Florida Keys. His aquatint is of a mature male Frigate in its spring plumage and two drawings of the bird’s feet are placed along the top edge of the plate.  The exquisite blackness of the Frigate’s plumage is magnified by the whiteness of the background, creating an image with both immediacy and beauty. Moreover, its simplicity makes it a superlative example of ornithological illustration, and its animation and artistic rendering exemplify the reason for the esteem in which John James Audubon is held.

Offered at $48,000      

Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668.

New Color

The pursuit of historically important maps has been a passion of mine for 45 years.

By far the best part of the experience has been learning the essence of history through maps.  While they certainly don't tell anywhere near the whole story they DO provide a visual guide to the results of exploration, political boundaries, the obstacles and advantages of geographical position for trade and the progress of art history through design motifs.

Another advantage of map collecting is that the corpus of reference books is extensive.  Using authors such as William Patterson Cumming, Seymour Schwartz,  R. V. Tooley, Nebenzahl, Tony Campbell, Henry Stevens, Martin and Martin one can quickly come to the realization of what truly is important and worth owning as opposed to what is derivative or even wrong when better information was available.

Of course, owning maps that are exactly as they were plus normal oxidation is key to the full enjoyment of possession.  

The history of map coloring in the 20th century probably had it greatest impetus because of American tourists in London in the 1960's.  Maps then were relatively inexpensive and easy to obtain.   With virtually no sophistication it is easy to understand why the London trade would find upper middle class professionals from the East Coast and the Midwest easy prey.   In fact it is my opinion that R. V. Tooley, Roger Baynton-Williams, Jonathan Potter, Weiss and quite a few others just didnt see anything wrong with the practice until I started saying it was wrong in the 1980's.

Then the fraud started to creep in as my proselytizing against new color took hold.   My broadcasting that a sheet of paper from the 16th century with color applied in the 20th century was an obscenity drove the practice underground.

Still it was then easy to tell the difference because there was no oxidation of the copper in the green pigment on the back of the map.  A simple flipping of the sheet was all that was necessary to tell the difference.

Of course the news of this spread to all collectors and it is now when the fraud started to occur as a conscious attempt was made to start faking original color.

Friday, August 5, 2011

Offering of the Day: "Rubus odoratus, Cornut." Georg Dionysius Ehret (1708-1770)


Georg Dionysius Ehret (1708-1770)
Rubus odoratus, Cornut (Purple-flowering Raspberry, Flowering Raspberry, or Virginia raspberry)
20 1/2 x 14 1/2 inches
Pencil, watercolor and bodycolor on vellum
Housed in contemporary gilt frame
From the distinguished collection at Croome Court

This work by Georg Dionysius Ehret holds an esteemed provenance, as it was once a part of the estate of the Earls of Coventry at Croome Court, Croome D’abitot, Worcestershire, probably commissioned by William Coventry, the fifth earl of Coventry (1676-1751). “As all Plants have their peculiar Beauties, ‘tis difficult to assign to any one an Elegance excelling all others, yet considering the curious Structure of the Flower, and beautiful Appearance of this whole Plant; I know of no Shrub that has a better Claim to it” – Mark Catesby “Natural History”. Ehret’s delicate and exquisitely fine portrait of a sprig of American Mountain Laurel corresponds intimately to his engraving “Ledum,” plate 38 of Christoph Jakob Trew’s (1695-1769)

“Plantae selectae quarum imagines ... pinxit Georgius Dionysius Ehret”. Nuremberg, 1750-1773.
“Plantae Selectae…” was the magnum opus of the long and fruitful collaboration between Trew and Ehret, but this fine watercolor is also testament to the collaboration between Ehret and Mark Catesby (1683-1749), the botanist and ornithologist most celebrated for his “Natural History of America,” (1754) where an almost identical engraving of the same sprig of Mountain Laurel is included as plate 98 “Chamaedaphne laurel Kalmia latifolia L.”

Ehret, a native of Germany, first travelled to England in 1735 with letters of introduction to patrons including Sir Hans Sloane and Philip Miller, curator of the Chelsea Physic Garden. Although he still travelled widely Ehret settled permanently in England in 1738, marrying a sister of Miller’s wife. Catesby was also patronized by Sloane, who helped fund Catesby’s plant hunting expedition to the Americas, and to whom Catesby gave a vast number of his original drawings, including those for his “Natural History…” amongst them the original drawing for “Chamaedaphne laurel…” A close comparison of the two botanist’s drawings for the Mountain Laurel is not necessary to see that not only were these two great artists working closely together but that they drew the very same specimen, although: “…the differences between the artist’s techniques are demonstrated clearly. And so is the extent to which Catesby appears consciously to have emulated Ehret. The shrub itself was highly prized by Catesby’s fellow horticulturists, and
several attempts … were made to propagate it in England” (McBurney).

It is quite probable that this particular specimen was grown by Catesby in his garden at Fulham: “after several unsu cessful Attempts to propagate it from Seeds, I procured Plants of it at several Times from America, but with little Success, for they gradually diminished, and produced no Blossoms; ‘till my curious Friend Mr. Peter Collinson, excited by a View of its dryed Specimens, and Descriptionn of it, procured some Plants of it from Pensilvania, which Climate being nearer to that of England, than from whence mine came, some Bunches of Blossoms were produced in July 1740, and in 1741, in my Garden at Fulham” (Catesby). McBurney, “Mark Catesby’s Natural History of America inches46 and 47; See: British Museum, Banks Ms. F.17 Ehret “Chamaedaphne.”

Interesting to note, the garden at Fulham has a unique and rich history. The Bishop of London Henry Compton (1632-1713) oversaw the estate at Fulham and its garden. He, like many other British patrons of botany, was a member of an esteemed botany club, the Temple Coffee House Botany Club. Compton eventually decided to assign John Banister, a young English clergyman and one of the first university-trained naturalists, to travel to Virginia, not only to document its plant life but also to send specimens back to England. Throughout his 14 years abroad, Banister sent over 340 species of plants to Fulham, thrilling his patrons as well as artists who later planted and painted the specimens there. Tragically, Banister was killed in 1762 before the completion of his mission and works he compiled for "Natural History of Virginia," when he was send on a trading and exploring trip with William Byrd. Jacob Colson, a woodsman in the party, shot and killed Banister after apparently mistaking him for a deer. Though his life was cut short, he was mourned by many and remembered as "the greatest virtuoso we ever had on this continent" by peers including John Lawson, who would later become a leading New World naturalist in his own right.  

Offered at $180,000

Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668.

Thursday, August 4, 2011

An Iconic College View: "Syracuse University" Rummell, Richard (1848-1924)

 "Syracuse University"
Richard Rummell (1848-1924)
Littig and Company, 1908

At the turn of the century, the accomplished landscape artist Richard Rummell (1848-1924) painted a panoramic bird’s-eye view watercolor of Syracuse University. From this watercolor, a copper-plate was engraved and a limited number of pulls (engravings) were distributed. Today, Arader Galleries owns the collection of copper plates used for engraving and watercolors. Using the original process and 100 year old original plates, Arader is proudly re-striking and making the beautiful college view available for acquisition the same way it was 100 years ago.

Formally established in 1870 in Syracuse, New York, the University originally owned 50 acres of land. Today, its expanded campus houses over 20,000 undergraduate and graduate students.  In the late 1880s the University began significant construction. Buildings such as Holden Observatory (1887), the von Ranke Library (1889), the Tolley Administration Building, and Crouse College (1889) emerged. Crouse College is prominently portrayed on the Rummell view, seen in the lower right. Together with the Hall of Languages, depicted lower left of center in the Rummell, this cluster of buildings formed what was called "Old Row” similarly organized to “Yale Row” of the 1790s. As additional buildings developed around campus, Old Row remained at the core of the campus. Important to note, the Hall of Languages was the first and the only building on the campus from 1873 until 1887 housing the College of Liberal Arts from its beginning. Since its erection, it has been expanded several times to be able to house additional wings and academic departments. Created from Onondaga limestone by architect Horatio N. White, the initial Hall of Languages cost $136,000 to construct.

To the lower right of the Rummell print is Crouse College, which was built in the Romanesque style by architect  Archimedes Russell in 1889. It cost nearly half a million dollars to construct. Along with his son D. Edgar Crouse, Mr. John Crouse, a local merchant, banker and University trustee funded the project. For many years Crouse College was the first accredited College of Fine Arts in the United States. Today, it houses the College of Visual and Performing Arts, the School of Music, art studios, music practice rooms, a lovely auditorium, and Crouse's Holtkamp Organ. The Crouse Chimes ring out several times each day.

An uncolored engraving of Syracuse University is available for $350. The beautifully hand colored example is $500. The view is also available through Arader Galleries in Curly Maple, Black, or Black and Gold frame for $750. There is no charge for shipping. Orders can be placed through our NYC gallery at 212-628-7625 or by contacting us via grahamarader@gmail.com

Wednesday, August 3, 2011

An Iconic College View: "University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill" Richard Rummell (1848-1924)


"University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill"
Littig & Co. 1907
20 X 29 in. unframed, 25 X 34 in. framed

At the turn of the century, the accomplished landscape artist Richard Rummell (1848-1924) painted a panoramic bird’s-eye view watercolor of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. From this watercolor, a copper-plate was engraved and a limited number of pulls (engravings) were distributed. Today, Arader Galleries owns the collection of copper plates used for engraving and watercoloring. Using the original process and 100 year old original plates, Arader is proudly re-striking and making the beautiful college view available for acquisition the same way it was 100 years ago. 

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the oldest state university with two hundred years worth of history. It was chartered in 1789 and was open for classes in 1795, becoming the first U.S. public university. During the Civil War, David Lowry Swain, the North Carolina Governor, persuaded the Confederate President Jefferson Davis to exempt students from fighting in the war. Even so, Chapel Hill lost much more of its population than any other village in the south and was forced to close during the Reconstruction in the late 19th century for five years.

On March 27, 1931, legislation was passed to integrate UNC with the State College of Agriculture and Engineering and the Women’s College to form the consolidated University of North Carolina, eventually becoming the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The first building to be constructed on the campus of America’s first state university was Old East. It served as a classroom building as well as a dormitory, but today, a renovated Old East houses men and women students as a residence hall. The cornerstone was ceremoniously laid down on October 12, 1793 and in 1877, Zebulon Baird Vance, the Governor of North Carolina and the chair of the Board of trustees, declared the anniversary of the construction as University Day. Since being built, the building was declared a national Historic Landmark in 1966. It can be seen as the tall elongated yellow building in the center right of the watercolor. The building is considered to be one of the symbols of UNC.

Surprisingly, the University’s signature structure is not an academic building but a small neoclassical structure placed over a well between Old East and Old West and at the south end of McCorckle Place. University president Edwin Alderman added the domed Old Well in 1897 as part of a campus beautification effort. He found the well’s original wooden cover shabby and ordered it replaced with a rotunda modeled in part after the Temple of Love at Versailles. Today, passer-bys are able to drink from the marble water fountain that sits in the center of the Old Well. Many students follow the campus tradition; a drink from the Old Well on the first day of classes will bring good luck. The Old Well is now a National Landmark for Outstanding Landscape Architecture. Rummel placed this particular structure in the center of the painting.

McCorckle Place is not a building, but rather a plot of land as seen in the foreground of the watercolor. William Richardson Davie supposedly selected the location for the university and has now a tree to commemorate it. Interestingly, the legend behind the Davie Poplar tree says that if the tree falls, so will the university. Because of the harsh weather, there are two genetic clones to ensure that the university will not collapse.

Person Hall, the red rectangular building located on the right hand side of the watercolor, is the university chapel that was essential in the Carolina’s early days. It was named for General Thomas Person, a donor of the original University, who paid $1,050 that allowed the University of North Carolina to complete the construction. It now serves as a music building.

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Rummell view is printed on fine woven paper circa 1910 from an engraved copper-plate by a master printer. Coloring is performed by a team of expert watercolorists, and framing is completed in-house with acid-free mat and high grade plexiglass that fits all museum specifications.

The uncolored engraving is available for $350. The beautifully hand colored example is $500. The W and L View is also available through Arader Galleries in Curly Maple, Black, or Black and Gold frame for $750. There is no charge for shipping. Orders can be placed through our NYC gallery at 212-628-7625 or by contacting us via grahamarader@gmail.com