________________________Please do not hesitate to direct all comments, questions, and inquiries to grahamarader@gmail.com_____________________________

Friday, September 30, 2011

William Bartram

William Bartram (1739-1823)

William Bartram
Travels Through North and South Carolina, Georgia, East & West Florida, the Cherokee Country, the Extensive Territories of the Muscogulges, or Creek Confederacy, and the Country of the Chactaws. Containing an Account of the Soil and Natural Productions of those Regions, together with Observations on the Manners of the Indians.
Philadelphia: James and Johnson 1791.
$35,000


      There is no naturalist who illustrates American flora and fauna with as much mysticism as William Bartram. In 1739 he was born into a Philadelphia Quaker family who raised him with an ardent devotion to exploring “God’s creation.” With reverent awe, he described the world around him as “a glorious apartment of the boundless palace of the sovereign Creator" and "a glorious display of the Almighty hand[1]." Fed by this spiritual adoration, Bartram’s naturalist career produced unforgettable discoveries and writings that have inspired readers for centuries.
      From an early age, William’s father John Bartram cultivated a passion for nature as he himself was the Royal Botanist to King George III. However, William received a higher education than his self-educated father and attended the Philadelphia Academy (a precursor of the University of Pennsylvania), where he studied the classics. Afterwards in 1765, Bartram journeyed to East Florida where he illustrated his father’s notes of the local plant and animal life. At that time Florida was larger, split into east and west territories, and the Treaty of Paris passed ownership from Spain to Great Britain in 1763. During these travels, William developed a keen eye. This resulted in multiple unique observations like his discovery of the “fragile celestial lily” near Lake Dexter, which no other naturalist found for the following 150 years. He also familiarized himself with the bizarre American animals like the gopher tortoise, the sandhill crane, and the Florida alligator, which he described as a dragon-like creature with a “horrifying roar.” Bartram also learned the Native American tribes of Florida, and developed an affinity for their languages and cultures [2].
       Later in 1772 Bartram took a commission from John Fothergill to collect specimens from other colonies. Months later he set off on a 2,400 mile voyage through the Carolinas, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, and Louisiana. From this trip he published his classic, Travels Through North & South Carolina, Georgia, East & West Florida, the Cherokee Country, the Extensive Territories of the Muscogulges, or Creek Confederacy, and the Country of the Chactaws; Containing An Account of the Soil and Natural Productions of Those Regions, Together with Observations on the Manners of the Indians. An “invaluable portrait” of 18th century American landscapes, Bartram mixed his classifications of animals and plants with alligator battles, American Indian encounters, and treacherous storm survival[3]. Unlike other early American naturalists, he didn’t just chronicle species. He illustrated the journey of an American spirit in his motherland. Europe adored his work and received it even more eagerly than his local peers. In fact, his book was translated into nearly every major European language. Decades later, America eventually caught on and even John James Audubon accredited the early 19th century Floridian “land boom” to Bartram’s poetic promotion of the state[4].
      Besides his tremendous contributions to American natural history, William Bartram left his mark outside of science as well. For botany, he identified 358 southeastern plants and discovered Georgia’s native oak-leaved hydrangea. For art, he produced captivating drawings of plants never seen before. He also inspired British Romantic poets like William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and American Transcendentalists like Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. These men often drew on Bartram’s mystical connection to nature to convey the New World[5]. This reverence for “creation” sets Bartram’s writing and drawings apart, securing his work as a classic for scientists as well as artist historians.
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[1] Kirkpatrick, Mary Alice. "William Bartram, 1739-1823 ." Documenting the American South homepage. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Sept. 2011. .
[2] "Florida Naturalists - William Bartram - Introduction." Florida Museum of Natural History. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Sept. 2011. .
[3] Kirkpatrick, Mary Alice. "William Bartram, 1739-1823 ." Documenting the American South homepage. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Sept. 2011. .
[4] "Florida Naturalists - William Bartram - Introduction." Florida Museum of Natural History. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Sept. 2011. .
[5] Kirkpatrick, Mary Alice. "William Bartram, 1739-1823 ." Documenting the American South homepage. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Sept. 2011. .

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Leepson Lafayette Lecture


You’ve seen this happen before.  A great writer takes the stage to talk about his new book – The Great American novel or the Great American meltdown circa 2008.  He opens his mouth, you wait, you wait, you doze and time drags on until you get to the book signing.  Great writers do not always make good oral storytellers.

Not so this past Friday at the Arader Gallery on Madison, when Mark Leepson, took us on a magical tour through his new biography of the Marquise de Lafayette, titled "Lafayette: Lessons in Leadership from the Idealist General". A blend of big stage history, amusing anecdotes, and doses of poignancy, Leepson spun a fascinating tale of this remarkable figure of the American Revolution.  

Mark Leepson bought that all to life for the twenty or so lucky people who gathered on a dreary rainy, Friday night.  Tell you the truth, I wasn’t really expecting much - dry colonial history on a wet night in NY. But an hour never went by so fast.  

Every American school child has heard the outlines of this story before. A young, wealthy, aristocrat crosses the seas in defiance of French royal edict in pursuit of glory and battle.  He bravely leads colonial troops uses his influence in the French court to gain critical support for the colonies against the British.  What you don’t get a sense from the schoolbooks is how much he loved the 13 Colonies and how much that love was returned by the American people.   On his tour of America in 1824-25,  he was welcomed by  massive crowds in every town that he visited retracing memorable events and battles of the Revolutionary War and greeted with a fervor that befits one of the true fathers of our country.   

To this day a US flag and French tricolor fly over his grave in France, and every July 4th, a gathering of French and American dignitaries  including the US ambassador gather at the grave site  to pay tribute to this hero of both sides of the Atlantic.  The French military band plays the Star Spangled Banner and then Le Marseillaise in what must truly be a moving experience and a reflection of the deep debt of gratitude we owe France - something that is easy to forget.  Like Gus Grissom said in the Right Stuff - no bucks, no Buck Rogers.  No French, no revolution.  Full disclosure - Mark didn't use that bit of pop culture.

One interesting fact among many was that at the pivotal Battle of Yorktown, there were more Frenchmen fighting (on land and sea) then there were colonials. He also let drop that in addition to Lafayette only six foreigners have ever been given US citizenship by act of congress.  Mother Teresa was another.  For the rest you figure it out or buy the book.

Credit to Walter Arader for pulling this together and the folks at  Kaller Historical Documents for bringing some amazing historical documents (a Declaration of Independence printed in Boston in July 1776) and signed letters by Lafayette, George Washington and other giants.  And check out the book.  Haven’t read it yet, but if it’s anything  like the talk it will be a can’t-put-it-down kind of a book. 

Alex K



Rare Map of the Day: "Londinum from Civitates orbis terrarum" Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg. 1572-1618

THE EARLIEST SURVIVING VIEW OF THE CITY OF LONDON

Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg
Londinum from Civitates orbis terrarum
Hand-colored woodcut
Framed size: 27 3/4” x 32 1/4”
Cologne, 1572-1618.


The views from George Braun and Frans Hogenberg's landmark Civitates orbis terrarum, completed in Cologne between 1572 and 1618, are among the most beautiful and important images of Renaissance cities. The Civitates was the first extensive series of town views that treated its subject matter in an accurate and meaningful way. Earlier collections of town views were far more limited in scope, and often made no real attempt to render the subject city with any degree of realism being simply a record of the existence of a town. Certainly the striking beauty and accuracy of Braun and Hogenberg's production was entirely unprecedented. Earlier collections contained no more than a handful of views, usually only of the more important cities, while the Civitates contained literally hundreds of views, including many of smaller towns for which no earlier views are known. Even for the larger, important cities, the Civitates is of the utmost importance to the history of their topography. The view of London, for example, is the earliest obtainable surviving map or view of that city.

Braun and Hogenberg envisioned this massive collection as a companion work to the Theatrum orbis terrarum, the first modern atlas, published by Abraham Ortelius in Antwerp from 1570. Indeed, Hogenberg had first-hand knowledge of that impressive and influential work, having been commissioned by Ortelius to engrave many of the plates for the maps it included. It took over forty years to collect all of the hundred of plans contained in the volumes that form the complete Civitates. The text was compiled and written by Braun, the Canon of Cologne Cathedral, and a total of five hundred views were eventually included. The majority of the engraving was completed by Hogenberg and Simon Novellanus, many after drawings by Joris Hoefnagel, a talented topographical artist.

The artistic merit of this particular plate is extremely high, and it reflects many of the same high standards of quality, in terms of color and decoration, that characterizes the maps of Ortelius. Embellished in the style of north European Renaissance art, it contains splendid examples of ornate strapwork and fretwork cartouches, a heraldic crest, a medallion, and perhaps most importantly, costumed figures that exhibit the regional fashions of the day. Legend holds that these charming figures were added to prevent the export of the book to the Islamic world, where artistic representation of the human figure was prohibited.

Moreover, this particular plate is an invaluable record of London as it was in the late sixteenth century. Under the Tudor's London mushroomed in size and its transformation was the phenomenon of the age. In 1500 it was classed as a middle-ranking medieval capital city, inhabited by approximately 40,000 people. Paris and Venice were more than double in size and commercially London was subservient to the vibrant mercantile centers of the Low Countries. By 1603 and the death of the last Tudor monarch, Elizabeth I, it had quadrupled in size housing close to 180,000 people. The sixteenth century witnessed what the 1615 edition of John Stow's Annales, or, a General Chronicle of England described as 'the unimaginable enlarging of London, and the suburbs, with the space of fiftie years.' However, the city's appearance was far from how we view it today. Most buildings were made of timber and architecturally inspired by Northern Europe. In essence it remained a medieval city lacking the beautiful Renaissance vistas and public spaces that had recently been created in Antwerp, Rome and Paris. It was not until 1666 and the Great Fire that vast tracts of the city were razed and London began to assume its present appearance. Thus, Braun and Hogenberg's view is a valuable record of the city as it used to look.

Offered at $18,000


Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668.


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Please do not hesitate to direct all comments, questions, and inquiries to grahamarader@gmail.com

Monday, September 26, 2011

Mark Catesby (1683-1749)

 Mark Catesby (1683-1749)

Mark Catesby (1682 - 1749)
Coccothraustes Purpurea - The Purple Grosbeak
Copperplate engraving with original hand-color
Image size: approximately 13 3/4 x 10 1/4 inches
First Edition
$9,500

      One hundred years before John James Audubon left his footprint in American nature studies, Mark Catesby pioneered the field. Born in Essex, England, he first visited America in 1712. From that year till his death in 1749, he devoted his life to completing the first flora and fauna studies and illustrations of the “New World[1]. ” 

      His North American adventure began in Virginia, where he met botanists and gardeners who introduced him to the province. From there he journeyed through the Blue Ridge Mountains, Bermuda, and Jamaica. During that seven-year visit he collected specimens that he ignited European interest in colonial natural history and caught the influential eyes of Sir Hans Sloane, benefactor of the British Museum, William Sherard, chairman of Botany at Oxford, and East India Trade Company merchant Charles Dubois. He also won the attention of the Royal Society, then chaired by Sir Isaac Newton. The attention of these enthusiasts earned him the funds to return to the colonies in 1722, this time with the specific intent to record their plant and animal life[2]. For the following four years, Native Americans guided him through Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia (which he titled Florida in his studies), and the Bahamas[3]. Using drawings and watercolors, Catesby labored to convey this new and bizarre world. 

      After Catesby returned in 1726, he devoted the following twenty years to documenting his studies in his publication Natural history of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Island. This masterpiece became the first book to illustrate the natural history of the American colonies. He devoted the first volume to his preferred area of study- the birds of America. In this work he chronicled 100 birds[4] , including several extinct species like the Carolina Parakeet, the Ivory-billed Woodpecker, and the Passenger Pigeon that today exist only in his art . Of the 220 plates involved, he produced 218 and supervised every element of production. The naturalist learned to engrave the copper plates himself[5] and oversaw the hand-coloring of the 160 copies. He personally wrote all descriptions and scientific analyses and provided the English and Latin names for each specimen[6]. Carolus Linnaeus would later employ Catesby’s naming system for thirty-eight birds in his “Systema Naturea[7] .” 

      A remarkable first in American natural history and a celebration of science in the 18th century, this publication won the admiration of many members of his field. In 1732, the Royal Society made Catesby a Fellow, exalting his work as “the most magnificent work [known] since the Art of printing has been discovered” . Later in 1768 King George III bought the three volumes of Catesby’s Natural History watercolors, which remain in the Royal Collection at Windsor Castle today[8]. While at times the fame of other naturalists overshadows Mark Catesby, one must remember that if Catesby had not pioneered the field, the rest may have never followed.


Essay composed by Amelie Brown of Arader Galleries New York City.
________________________________________


[1]Wright, Terry . "The Life & Works of Mark Catesby, America’s First Naturalist/Illustrator." JJ Audubon Gallery. Beth & Terry Wright, n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2011. .

[2]Wright, Terry . "The Life & Works of Mark Catesby, America’s First Naturalist/Illustrator." JJ Audubon Gallery. Beth & Terry Wright, n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2011. .
[3]"Catesby, Mark." Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography. 2008. Encyclopedia.com. 13 Sep. 2011.

[4]"Mark Catesby." Catesby Commemorative Trust. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2011.
[5]"Mark Catesby." Catesby Commemorative Trust. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2011.
[6]"Catesby, Mark." Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography. 2008. Encyclopedia.com. 13 Sep. 2011.
[7]Wright, Terry . "The Life & Works of Mark Catesby, America’s First Naturalist/Illustrator." JJ Audubon Gallery. Beth & Terry Wright, n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2011. .

[8]Wright, Terry . "The Life & Works of Mark Catesby, America’s First Naturalist/Illustrator." JJ Audubon Gallery. Beth & Terry Wright, n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2011. http://www.jjaudubongallery.com/Catesby%20Bio.htm.

Mark Catesby (1682-1749)
The Sea Hermitcrab
Copperplate engraving with original hand-color
Image size: approximately 13 3/4 x 10 1/4 inches
First Edition
$3,800








Friday, September 23, 2011

Hummingbird Draft Day


How many different ways can you buy and sell art?  Well you can buy directly from a dealer, you can fight with others at auction or you can play the Arader Galleries syndication distributed offering “game”. What that means is that you buy individual shares which entitle you to buy five lithographs (at a cost of $4,800) from John Gould’s famous hummingbird magnum opus.  Here’s the fun part.  It’s like a fantasy football draft, where your draft position determines the order of when you pick a player (or in this case hummingbird).  So if you have the number one pick (the draft order was chosen randomly), you choose first and then you choose first again in the next “round”. And the offering game ends when all the lithographs have been selected.  The great thing about this draft is that there are no bad picks (unlike those of you who may have chosen Peyton Manning as their QB like I did in my recent fantasy football draft, and we all know how that’s playing - or not playing - out).

Anyway back to live action.  We had a gathering of loyal Gould fans on Super Saturday (Sep 17) on the second floor of the 1016 Madison Avenue gallery.  The draft order was set via numbered ping pong balls and we were off to the races. You’d think with over 400+ picks the draft would take a while, but it moved swiftly along – a shade over two hours. Some people agonized over their choices, others trusted the advice of their chosen draft guides namely Captains Graham Arader, Caleb Kiffer, Lori Cohen and Alison Petretti. Thankfully, there were no fouls or unsportsmanlike behavior at least as far as we could see. It was good fun and people walked away satisfied with their picks.  Not a bad way to spend a Saturday.

Guest blogger:  Alex K

Thursday, September 22, 2011

What the plunge in Stock Markets, Gold and Oil mean to you.

What is real?

A well run company, a producing oil well, an "A" commercial building in a vibrant city, an iconic, spectacular work of art.

OR

Is it $1,000,000 in cash.

The whole world is playing into the hands of some very bright central bankers by fleeing to cash which is entirely the construct of governments to tax and control.   When they allow this "measure of value" to inflate by creating more it is a hidden tax for all of us because it dilutes what we have.

People running to cash right now are fools doing exactly what the central bankers of the world want them to do.   Selling real assets for cash plays into their hands.

The whole construct holding 7 billion people together on this planet is belief that cash is real.   These politician bankers will do anything and everything to make you believe that "their" cash is better than something that truly is real.

It is not.

The only good reason to hold or believe in cash is that it holds our wonderful society together.  It keeps the poor fools that believe in it working 40 hours a week, 52 weeks a year for their entire working lives.  In the end 99% of them die with nothing because they believed in this construction of shimmering value based on a foolish belief that it is real rather than a medium of exchange.

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Rare Map of the Day: "Map of the Counties of New York, Queens, Kings & Richmond" David H Burr, 1829

A LOVELY MAP OF NEW YORK

David H. Burr
Map of the Counties of New York, Queens, Kings & Richmond
Engraving
Paper size: 19 1/2 x 14 inches  Frame size: 29 1/4 x 23 inches
Engraved by Rawdon Clark and Co. Albany and Rawdon, Wright and Co, NY, 1829


“The Atlas of the State of New York” was published in 1830 [although it bears the date 1829]. It was the second state atlas produced in the United States; the very first was the 1825 "Atlas of the State of South Carolina" produced by Robert Mills. Although [Surveyor General Simeon] DeWitt provided information and sponsorship and put his powerful influence behind the project, the producer of the atlas was David Burr (1803-1875)...The Burr "Atlas…" is a landmark document that constitutes one of the most precise cartographic records of the state. It contains a general map of the state, a large plan of New York City, and maps of each county...The Burr "Atlas…" marks a major change. The whole state, the major city, each and every county is depicted in a uniform style and scale, with accompanying standardized statistical information and narrative. The state is given shape and form and substance in the atlas. All the counties are now joined together, a civil union is complete, all the land is subdivided, the marks of progress are recorded and celebrated... " (John Rennie Short, Representing the Republic: Mapping the United States 1600-1900, pp. 85-88). Howes B1017. Phillips, Atlases, 2206. Walter Ristow, American Maps & Mapmakers: Commercial Cartography in the 19th Century, pp. 103-108. Sabin 19873.

Offered at $8,500

Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668.


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Please do not hesitate to direct all comments, questions, and inquiries to grahamarader@gmail.com

City View of the Day: "The City of New York" Currier and Ives, 1884

A FANTASTIC AMERICAN IMAGE, "THE CITY OF NEW YORK," BY CURRIER AND IVES

Currier & Ives
"The City of New York"
Hand-colored lithograph
New York, 1884
Paper size: 26” by 38”, Framed size: 38” by 39”

The publishing firm of Currier & Ives created the most popular and highly regarded lithographs of quintessentially American scenes ever produced. The quality, vast scope and engagingly populist style of their works have made their names synonymous with an idealistic vision of 19th-century American promise and optimism. Currier & Ives' broad productivity was accompanied by consistently high standards of printing and hand-coloring, and their ability to draw on original works by many of the finest American genre painters of the times, including (among many others) Fanny Palmer, Louis Maurer, Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait and George Durrie. Even (or perhaps especially) today, Currier & Ives prints are paragons of Americana. Indeed, to most Americans over forty years of age, their firm's name has the ring of a household word or familiar brand name, perhaps as recognizable as Proctor & Gamble or Arm & Hammer. It is a name that conjures up a particular view of America's past. When we speak about the art of Currier & Ives, we are talking of cultural patrimony, a vital part of this nation's identity, on a par with the Empire State Building, the Grand Canyon, and the Star-Spangled Banner.

When Currier & Ives emerged onto the popular scene, the public's appetite had been whetted by what amounted to a media boom that took place in the United States during the 1840s and 1850s. The introduction of photography, more rapid methods of picture printing (including lithography), and the rise of illustrated journalism exploited, among the urban bourgeoisie of the period, a strong interest in topical information, fine art, and plain amusement. Currier & Ives produced an unprecedented inventory of titles for this audience, a move that dramatically lifted the firm above its competition, and elevated their imagery iconic status.

Currier & Ives was founded in New York in 1835 by Nathaniel T. Currier, who had been apprenticed as a youth to the Boston lithographic firm of William S. & John Pendleton. In 1857, James Merritt Ives, the company's bookkeeper and Currier's brother-in-law, was made a partner. Generally, Currier supervised production while Ives handled the business and financial side. Currier & Ives prints were decorative and inexpensive, ranging in price from 20¢ to $3. Their subject matter ranged from rural life, ships, trains, animal and sporting scenes to religious images and spectacular news events. The firm produced more than 7000 titles and became the largest and most successful American lithographic publishing company of the 19th century. Vigorous marketing through published catalogues, a sales staff and agents throughout the USA, as well as in London, enabled Currier & Ives to capture approximately three-quarters of the American print market in the peak years of the firm's popularity. Both black-and-white and colored prints were sold; color was usually applied by a staff of women working in a production line from a model, although some prints were sent out for additional hand-coloring.

Although many of the large number of artists employed by Currier & Ives simply copied the designs of others on to the stone, original works were also commissioned. These occasionally included pictures by well-known artists, such as Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait and George Henry Durrie, but more often commissions went to artists closely associated with the firm.

By the time Currier retired in 1880 in favor of his son Edward West Currier, chromolithography and photography had already begun to challenge the Currier & Ives market. Broader cultural changes also hastened the decline in appeal of the company's products: exuberant self-confidence and belief in the simple values and homely virtues that the Currier & Ives image had come to symbolize had largely passed from the scene. Already in the 1940s, however, there was an enormous resurgence in popularity of Currier & Ives' prints, yet in the intervening years, neglect and disregard had led to vastly diminished numbers of their surviving works. Prints that once existed in thousands of examples were suddenly rare collectors' items, a situation that has only become more pronounced over time, to the extent that several of the most desirable Currier & Ives lithographs exist in just a handful of examples.

This breathtaking hand-colored bird's-eye view, The City of New York, is one of the most desirable views by the prominent American publishers, and is exceptionally hard to find in this large folio size. In the highly detailed image, Manhattan is pictured from the south over looking the business district. A steamer rounds the tip of the island while other boats scatter the surrounding waterways. New York stretches forth in its entirety, flanked by the Hudson River on the left and the East River on the right. On the right, the Brooklyn Bridge is shown just one year after its opening. Glimpses of New Jersey, Queens, and Brooklyn can been seen in the outskirts. Currier and Ives' City of New York is truly a magnificent work, and depicts the world's commercial center then in a boom of technological and economic progress.

Offered at $35,000.

Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668.


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Please do not hesitate to direct all comments, questions, and inquiries to grahamarader@gmail.com


Thursday, September 15, 2011

Rare Map of the Day: "Generaele Karte van West Indien" Arent Roggeveen (d. 1679) and Jacob Robijn (d. c. 1710)

A Stunning map of the West Indies by Arent Roggeveen and Jacob Robijn

Arent Roggeveen (d. 1679) and Jacob Robijn (d. c. 1710)
"Generaele Karte van West Indien"
From the Het Brandende Veen
Copperplate engraving with hand-color
Amsterdam: Pieter Goos Ca. 1680
Paper size approximately: 16 7/8" x 20 ½"

Arent Roggeveen is a man to whom students of cartography owe a great debt. The Het Brandende Veen provides a unique insight into the archives of one of the most influential companies in the early history of America. Through his work much of the invaluable charting of the Dutch West India Company has been saved. It is the first maritime atlas devoted to the Americas. Born in Delfshaven, he went to Middleburg in 1658, an important centre of shipping and commerce. A notable mathematician, his skills extended to surveying and navigation. He wrote a treatise on the appearance of a comet in 1664-65, and even turned his hand to poetry. He became a tutor of navigation to the pilots of both the Dutch West and East India Companies.

With his connections at the Dutch West India Company, Roggeveen had access to all the manuscript charts at their disposal. It must not be presumed that the company's observations were all their own. Indeed, many were undoubtedly Spanish in origin. In the book Roggeveen tells us that over twenty years he formed a large collection of manuscript charts. Either way much of the knowledge they contained would not have survived to today without Roggeveen's Het Brandende Veen. The word Veen as well as being part of the author's title name means 'fen' in English. The English translation "The Burning Fen," refers to the practice of burning peat along the coastline to act as a beacon for passing ships.

This fascinating sea chart depicts the area of the most intense European interest at the time: the northern coast of South America, the West Indies, and the east coast of North America up to present day New England. Highly detailed and exquisititely colored, this rare map is rarely on the open market. It provides a fascinating view of Dutch knowledge of these important waters. A beautiful and important map.
 
Offered at $28,000
 
Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668.


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Please do not hesitate to direct all comments, questions, and inquiries to grahamarader@gmail.com

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Audubon of the Day: John James Audubon "American Widgeon"


           AUDUBON’S AMERICAN WIDGEON FROM HIS SEMINAL BIRDS OF AMERICA
 


John James Audubon
Plate 345: American Widgeon
From The Birds of America
Aquatint engraving with original hand color
Paper size: 25 1/2 x 36 inches
London: Robert Havell, Jr., 1827-38
$15,000

Born in Haiti, John James Audubon spent his youth in France, where he studied for a time under Jacques Louis David. Returning to America in 1803, he embarked upon a series of ill-fated ventures as a farmer, merchant, and portrait painter. Yet none of these occupations engaged Audubon as much as his avocation: the search for birds and the studies and drawings that he made to record his discoveries and observations. A tireless entrepreneur, Audubon devoted himself to an unprecedented project, becoming the first to attempt the seemingly insurmountable task of documenting all the bird life of North America. This task grew out of a genuine and passionate interest in his subjects, and Audubon determined not only to complete a project that no one else had undertaken, but to approach it in an entirely innovative manner. The artist's tireless efforts and remarkable talent culminated in the publication in London of his 435-plate Birds of America (1827-1838), undoubtedly the greatest work on birds ever produced.

Audubon's Birds are unparalleled by anything that preceded or followed in the history of art. The artist imbued his images with such vitality that each bird seems to rise from the page, and with such art and drama that ornithological illustration was changed indelibly. Every one of Audubon's birds symbolizes the spirit of American ingenuity and entrepreneurial instincts that fueled the project. The artist’s style and his persona were much like the European notion of America itself: ambitious, animated, larger than life. The celebration of this quintessentially American work, and the enterprising, talented artist who created it, has grown steadily since the time of its publication.

Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668.

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Please do not hesitate to direct all comments, questions, and inquiries to grahamarader@gmail.com

Monday, September 12, 2011

City View of the Day: "New York from Latting Observatory" William Wellstood, 1855

William Wellstood
New York from the Latting Observatory
(American Born in Scotland 1819-1900)
Hand-color engraving after Benjamin Franklin Smith, Jr.
Dimensions: 49 1/2" x 34"
New York, 1855

This impressive view, painted by Benjamin Franklin, Jr. from the Latting Observatory, gives a fascinating glimpse of mid-19th century New York. Perhaps the most striking aspect of this splendid view is the lack of development in this area, now among the most busy centers of commerce in Manhattan, then almost at the northern end of the populous zones of the city. In the immediate foreground is 42nd Street, then the Croton Reservoir, which was built in 1839-42 and demolished at the turn of the century to make way for the New York Public library. The spectacular Crystal Palace, which adjoins the Croton Reservoir, was the centerpiece of the 1853 World’s Fair. Occupying on the site of the present-day Bryant Park, it was destroyed by fire in the late 1850’s. To the direct north were the stately mansions of Fifth Avenue and further north was Harlem, which was practically another city in the nineteenth century.

The Latting Observatory, from which this view was taken, was built in 1852 for the World’s Fair, and it was too burned to the ground in 1858. Constructed from timber braced with iron, it stood near the northwest corner of 5th Avenue and 42nd Street, and was over 300 feet high - probably the highest edifice erected in America at the time. The Observatory was of special fascination for New Yorkers, for it had a steam elevator providing access to the first and second landings, where telescopes were provided to allow the most encompassing views of the city. The view receded in deep perspective to include both the East River and Hudson River, Brooklyn, Staten Island, and New Jersey. This splendid view gives a glimpse of the city’s former monuments and is a rare and valuable document of its exponential growth over the last 150 years.
 
Offered at $28,000
Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668.


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Please do not hesitate to direct all comments, questions, and inquiries to grahamarader@gmail.com

Friday, September 9, 2011

Rare Map of the Day: "Map of the United States, Exhibiting the Post-Roads, the Situations, Connexions & Distances of the Post-Offices..." Abraham Bradley, Jr.

 Bradley’s Groundbreaking Map of the United States

Abraham Bradley, Jr.
Map of the United States, Exhibiting the Post-Roads, the Situations, Connexions & Distances of the Post-Offices...

Engraving with original hand color
Sheet size: 38 3/4" x 53"
Philadelphia, 1804
Literature: Schwartz and Ehrenberg, The Mapping of America, pl 136.

Abraham Bradley, Jr.'s Map of the United States... as defined in the early nineteenth century was a landmark production, arguably the first such detailed map produced by an American mapmaker. It was nothing less than a visual testament to the growing expertise of the country's printers and cartographers after the triumph of the Revolution. An indigenous cartography sprang up and eventually flourished during the nineteenth century in response to nationalism, exploration, settlement, war, rising literacy, and finally, the exploitation of natural resources. Bradley was one of the first proponents of this burgeoning trade in domestic maps, and the high commercial value of his map for Americans at the turn of the century is indisputable.

Bradley's groundbreaking Map of the United States... constitutes a comprehensive and accurate record of roads, distances, post offices, and "ports of entry and delivery for foreign vessels," and includes plats in Ohio and Indiana. His map shows the great disparity of information that characterized knowledge of the East, which is exceedingly detailed, and that of the Midwest and beyond.  An inset of North America is all but blank beyond the Mississippi River, for this map was, in fact, executed on the eve of Lewis & Clark's great expedition into the Pacific Northwest. As such, Bradley's map captures a moment in American history, just before the extent of the nation's geography and (potential) expanse was about to change drastically. 

Inset Map of North America

Offered at $275,000.

Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668.

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Please do not hesitate to direct all comments, questions, and inquiries to grahamarader@gmail.com

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Please join us September 23rd for a discussion on Revolutionary War French General Lafayette by Historian Marc Leepson at Arader Galleries- 1016 Madison Avenue

On Friday, September 23rd at 7 PM, Marc Leepson, a noted historian and journalist, will be giving a talk on his latest book, Lafayette: Lessons in Leadership from the Idealist General, at the Arader Galleries' 1016 Madison Avenue townhouse. The book, Mr. Leepson's seventh, is a concise biography of the Marquis de Lafayette, the renowned French general and statesman who was the most revered foreigner in the early American republic. To learn more about Mr. Leepson and Lafayette, please visit his website http://www.marcleepson.com/

In conjunction with Mr. Leepson’s talk, a selection of historically significant maps relating to Lafayette’s service in the American Revolution will be on view, including:
(Link in each caption leads to full offering) 

This map captures the topography of the Revolutionary War’s third year and very beginning of the alliance between the French and American forces.   
  
Published in 1825, this second edition is the only issue created in celebration of General Lafayette’s transformational visit to the city. 


Published in 1777, this map was used during the battle of Rhode Island (Battle of Quaker Hill), where Lafayette served with distinction at the request of General George Washington.   

We hope you will join us for what will surely prove to be an enlightening talk regarding one of early America’s most important figures. Please feel free to contact us with any questions regarding the event.

Offering of the Day: "Carte du theatre de la guerre entre les Anglais et les Americains...." Louis Brion de la Tour, 1777

AN IMPORTANT MAP SHOWING AMERICAN AND BRITISH TROOP POSITIONS DURING THE AMERICAN WAR OF INDEPENDENCE
Louis Brion de la Tour
"Carte du theatre de la guerre entre les Anglais et les Americains: dressee d'apres les cartes Anglaises les plus modernes"
Engraving with original hand-color
30 1/4” x 21”; Paris, 1777.

On November 15, 1777, the Continental Congress met and selected the name “The United States of America” for the thirteen colonies that formed a government under the Articles of Confederation. One month later, the French decided to recognize American independence, after learning of the American victory at Saratoga, and the defeat of Burgoyne. By January 8th, the French foreign minister Charles Gravier, Comte de Vergennes, informed American envoys that France was ready to engage in an alliance.
 
This spectacular first edition French map was copied from British sources and shows the theater of conflict between the Americans and British during the third year of the War of Independence. It depicts British troop positions at Germantown and Frankfort, Pennsylvania. The only military notation on the map is the one American victory against the French at Saratoga, which was instrumental in bringing France into the war on the American side.

Offered at $18,000
 
Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668.

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Please do not hesitate to direct all comments, questions, and inquiries to grahamarader@gmail.com

Tuesday, September 6, 2011

A chance to own 1% of the finest Italianate Victorian Home in America - with views of the Hudson River and a swimming pool.


About 7 years ago, in a fit of passion our family paid $5,950,000 for a magnificent home on the Hudson River.  It was Helen Hayes' home for 61 years and was in very good condition.  

Since then $1,000,000 has been spent on a collection of conifers and Japanese Cutleaf Maples.

My wife loves our home in New York and does not want to live in Nyack about thirty-five minutes from the city.  So we have stayed there only 6 nights in 7 years!!!

Like most real estate the house is now worth about 25% less than I paid for it or $4,500,000.

It would kill me to sell the house and so 1% shares are now available for $45,000 or you can makes gifts totaling $60,000 to my favorite charities.  This gives you full use of the house to stay in whenever it is not in use up to 30 days a year and full use for the grounds for 365 days a year.  There is a very nice pool.    With this ownership you will be required to pay 1% of the overhead of running the house.  My guess is that overhead will be in the range of $300,000 a year.

You can see this house by going to the Pretty Penny Website - http://aradergalleries.net/prettypenny/

This is an insanely good deal.  It only takes 35 minutes to get there from Manhattan and the property is in mint condition!  If you would like a personal tour, please let me know.

Graham Arader

Offering of the Day: "Coming to the Point" William Sydney Mount (1807-1868)

William Sidney Mount (1807-1868)
"Coming to the Point"
Lithograph with original hand color
Framed: 40 1/2 x 38 1/2 inches ; Paper: 26 1/8 x 23 7/8 inches
Lithograph by Soulanor Trissier, Published by W. Schaus/Goupil & Co.

 New York, 1855

In the mid-19th century, painting was at a peak of popularity in the United States as American artists looked for styles and subject matters by which they might distinguish a truly American esthetic, one that was distinctive and independent from European influence.  Many artists considered their creative work the province not of a cultural élite but that of the American populace at large, and a celebrated proponent of this conception, William Sidney Mount, instructed: "Paint not for the few but the many."  Mount set the tone for a major trend in American art, creating genre scenes dedicated to the recording of everyday life in small American towns.  While in the following years such subjects were to become wildly popular, Mount was one of the first major proponents of the new emphasis on American life.  Born and raised in rural Long Island, Mount enjoyed an idyllic childhood and his most acclaimed artwork recreated scenes from the small-town life he had known in his youth.  When he began his artistic training, however, Mount struggled to gain a foothold painting in the European manner, and devoting himself to historical and mythological subjects.  It was not until he returned to his home town, Stony Brook, that he immersed himself increasingly in what was familiar, rural, and his own, narrowing his life down to an exclusive love affair with one corner of the earth.  Like a number of his colleagues, he created images that held a timeless resonance for Americans, evoking a way of life that was at once familiar and idealized.  

Offered at $9,000
 
Arader Galleries intends to have the lowest prices on ABE, Alibris, Biblio, AE, and Artnet while maintaining the highest levels of quality in the business for every offering. To inquire or view the complete offering, please contact our curators at info@aradernyc.com or call our 72nd Street NYC gallery at (212) 628-3668.

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Please do not hesitate to direct all comments, questions, and inquiries to grahamarader@gmail.com

Saturday, September 3, 2011

Two master professors of European History have a fully subscribed class at Northeastern University in Boston using Arader Galleries' gift of original maps to teach the course.

Dear Graham,

Beryl and I are pleased to announce that the course on "Picturing the World," made possible by your generosity, is now filled to capacity, with 40 students, and we haven't even begun classes yet.  Thanks again and best wishes for the long weekend.  Georges

Georges Van Den Abbeele
Founding Dean,
College of Social Sciences and Humanities
100 Meserve Hall
360 Huntington Avenue
Northeastern University
Boston, MA 02115

g.vandenabbeele@neu.edu
617-373-5164
617-373-2942 fax

Member, European Academy of Sciences

Friday, September 2, 2011

A Giant from Northeastern University gives me a valued chance to be involved with his teaching program.

Northeastern University
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

September 1, 2011
Graham Arader
29 East 72nd Street
New York, NY, 10021


Dear Graham,

It is with extraordinary delight and gratitude that I've received word of the delivery and safe arrival here at Northeastern University of over 50 historic maps and botanical prints from Arader Galleries. This is an amazing collection that visibly charts the historical development of cartography and the natural sciences.

I cannot express how indebted we are to you for this collection, which renders materially possible the innovative course I am mounting this term, along with Professor Beryl Schlossman of the English Department, to help young people appreciate how we have learned to “picture the world” and come to understand “what nature is.” This course in interdisciplinary social sciences and humanities (INSH 1101, “Picturing the World,” Reg # 16180) will cover the ways in which human beings from the sixteenth through early nineteenth centuries arrived at a scientific understanding of the world through the artistic representation of different places, peoples, plants and creatures. The course is thus a rare combination of art history, natural history, cartography, anthropology and cultural analysis, i.e. a true introduction to the liberal arts and sciences!

Classes have yet to begin (our start date is September 7), but already we have some 37 students enrolled out of 40 available seats, not bad for a course we just put on the books over the summer! Clearly, there is a wealth of student interest here, and we aim to challenge these young minds to even greater appreciation and critical awareness. 

But it is the Arader collection that is the centerpiece of the course and makes our educational objectives possible, and for that we are deeply appreciative. At this point, we are eagerly awaiting full installation of the collection, which is scheduled to take place in the next few days and before we meet with the class for the inaugural meeting next Wednesday. We are teaching the course in classroom 294 of the Snell Library. This is a great location with a secure classroom and adjacent lounge where art can be used for your class and also be displayed openly for serendipitous encounters by students during study breaks and explorations of the library and environs. I also feel this is a fitting shrine for the works and for the classroom experience students will glean from their presence.

Once we're up and running, I'll send you periodic updates of what your generous gift is making possible. In the meantime, please accept this opening letter of appreciation and our best wishes to you and your terrific staff that is making our dreams – and those of our students – come true!

Again, many thanks for this extraordinary collection!

Yours,
Georges Van Den Abbeele
Founding Dean,
College of Social Sciences and Humanities
100 Meserve Hall
360 Huntington Avenue
Northeastern University
Boston, MA 02115
g.vandenabbeele@neu.edu
617-373-5164
617-373-2942 fax
Member, European Academy of Sciences





A letter from Richard Ovendon, Librarian at the Bodleian. The best letter than any book dealer could ever hope to receive!

Dear Graham

Thank for for a truly stunning visit. It was a REAL thrill to see you Atlas Room – one of the great book rooms in the world, with those fabulous Ptolemies and Saxtons etc etc. And then the rest of the two premises were so full of incredible things that my head is still swimming with it all. I feel like uttering the words of Howard Carter when asked what he saw when he peered  into the tomb of Tutankhamun: ‘wonderful things’.

Thank you too for introducing me to your wonderful staff and for lunch and sharing your home with me!

We will continue to be in touch about many things, and your interest in the Marks of Genius project is really encouraging.  Also, make sure Walter emails me when he gets to Oxford.

When are you next in the UK?

As ever

Richard